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Hardware Software Tech

Platform + Services = Jackpot!?

Platforms. Thats the clear takeaway for computing as a whole.

No doubt, its been there for some time. Microsoft pivoting so hard just makes it clear as day.

With their October 2nd event, they laid out their hand. Taking a bet in a couple of directions.

The key ones being the Surface Pro X, Surface Neo and Surface Duo. Each going different ways. The later two being a technology showcase as they aren’t planned for release until 2020 at the earliest.

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The Surface Pro X is the rumoured ARM based 2 in 1 returned. It very much looks like a direct iPad Pro competitor and is priced similarly. Armed with LTE and good battery life (hopefully).

Interesting side note is that the storage can be user upgraded. Its using a new M.2 2230 SSD.

As with the original Windows RT, compatibility will be the big issue. Enough so that Microsoft put out some initial notes.

The Surface Neo has floated around Microsoft’s design studio for some time. This looks like Microsoft’s wildest bet. The demonstration was extremely hand wavy but showed the use cases.

Actual hardware details are scant. The promo video showing that it runs Intel so compatibility should be no problem. A customised OS to handle the 2 screens, Windows 10X. Apparently its pronounced, Windows ten ten?

The interesting part is the Windows UI customisation to the magnetic keyboard. The LCD panel switching to a track pad mode or a minimised screen / Touch Bar depending on where the keyboard sits.

Given the small size and internals, the battery life will be key. This looks pitched at a similar market to the Surface Go. The Go has been popular but one of the key knocks has been poor battery life.

Its an intriguing device nonetheless. Able to meet a wide variety of use cases while still being super portable.

The issue will be, will it find an audience. Where the Go neatly filled the low end, affordable portable niche. The Neo is likely going to fall between the Go and the regular Pro.

Again, price will be a major factor. Especially when the customer hears that the keyboard and Surface pen costs extra. (Pure conjecture but thats how the Surface Pro has rolled.)

Then for the almost “One more thing” moment. Don’t call it a comeback. Panos Panay jokingly had something left to announce.

It wasn’t presented as a phone.

Given how mature the smart phone market is. Microsoft having learnt a lesson from their first go round has partnered with Google. The special sauce being the work to allow Android to work with a dual screen UI.

It’ll be interesting to see just how much work was done. I’ve no doubt that Microsoft will have a uniform user experience within its own apps. But how soon does the UI fall apart as disparate Android apps are loaded.

The over arching issue here is development. Theres disparate versions of Windows on different architectures and then theres Android. I know Microsoft has been working hard on platform agnostic development tools.

Successfully so. At this point, they’ve managed to claw back a lot of developer mindshare. Delivering great open technology and tools. Even building Windows out as a developer OS. Can I get a high five for WSL!

However they’re all very different paradigms. Some like Windows 10X and the dual screen Android UI still in development.

To be successful, these products need to find an audience. Microsoft themselves have productivity covered. But a healthy App Store is needed. Even if its just to convert a sale.

Microsoft has always been a leader in development tools. So much so, that Windows always led in the desktop OS wars. Winning developer mindshare allowing it to dominate business and consumer markets with software alone.

However the computing landscape is very different today. The ubiquitous computing platform isn’t a desktop computer. <Billie Eilish>Duh</Billie Eilish>

At the core, each target platform has its own particulars and APIs / tool sets. Microsoft has clearly said they want developer input. The problem will be just how much work is involved in delivering to all these different devices and will it be worth it.

Users want a good selection of apps. Developers want a large paying user base to sell to. The issue is kick starting an App Store which has neither.

Third party developers will be faced with deciding on what to deliver to. Its a similar problem that Apple has been trying to address. Although from a very different angle.

Even Apple has struggled. When they have the advantage of a more uniform product set and significantly more control over those products. Along with one of the biggest App stores and largest paying user bases focused almost exclusively on the iPhone.

With Swift and unified APIs, Apple are hoping to make delivering macOS and iPadOS simpler and easier. Enough so as to entice iOS developers to broaden these smaller markets.

Microsoft has yet to address any of this in a significant way. Maybe the next Build ? If they can develop this into a platform then they can leverage those sweet sweet subscription services.