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Hardware Tech

Mac Pro – Just how pro?

So Mac Pro day has come and gone. Its taken awhile to get my head around just what exactly the 2019 Mac Pro does and where it fits.

Workstation. HEDT. Theres a lot of categories and even more user expectations.

On the face of it. The Mac Pro, especially the base configuration, is an extraordinary bad value. The single core and multi core benchmarks are pretty average. Factor in the price of the base config in your country and, yeah. Its looks very hard to justify.

Apple have done themselves a disservice with the Pro name. Across the product range its applied to mean various things.

With iPads, its a nebulous range of additional features that don’t really distinguish the iPad Pro all that much from the more mundane models. There’s just the horrendous price.

Similarly, the Pro in the iPhone 11 range denoting the premium line. Again, the price to features being a little nebulous. Just expensive.

The Macbooks are a lot clearer. The Macbook Pros are the most capable. Especially the 2019 16 inch Macbook Pro. However they are priced as a mainstream device. The balance of processor, memory and storage for the relative price is bearable.

This diverges more with the iMacs. The iMac Pro is kitted out similarly to the Mac Pro with workstation grade internals. Running a Xeon processor and ECC memory. It offers a good value proposition in terms of processor, memory and storage, even for its steep base price.

Its biggest issue is that it requires an Apple technician to do upgrades.

As an aside, the elephant in the room for the iMac Pro is “Does it have a future?”. Theres been no update for some time.

Enter the Mac Pro. Its clearly a workstation and the price paid is for all the engineering thats gone into its design.

As Quinn’s video shows and iFixIt’s rating confirms. The Mac Pro is totally user serviceable. Initial testing is confirming that its capable of handling loads easily without sounding like a jet engine.

Viewed from this angle. As a purely commercial workstation. The Mac Pro makes sense.

The problem is that configurability is table stakes in the PC world. For general computing and hobbyists, its hard to justify. Its something thats a given with high end desktops.

Part of the overall problem is on Intel. The glacial pace of the Xeon roadmap and supporting chip set features. Its hard not to look at what AMD Ryzen and Threadripper bring to the table.

Performance is very much on par with the chip specs. Single core scores are tied to clock speed and multi-core scales out with the number of cores on tap.

There are still other trade offs. For example, Nvidia have done significant work to accelerate machine learning. However Apple have intentionally disallowing support for their GPUs.

The Mac Pro is competitive in key areas like video editing. Some features like the Afterburner card and custom dual GPUs are a clear advantage.

However its harder to say beyond that. There are as many options at any and all price points if macOS isn’t mandatory. All of which are flexible.

While Apple forces its customers to make sacrifices at all price points.

The Mac Pro comes at a huge premium for its flexibility. Hard to justify beyond the small market that can. Which is a shame as it still leaves a huge unfulfilled customer market.